Hatshoot 2013 No8, Cowboys and the Gentry!

In the image below the bowler hat is by Tracy Wells you can follow Tracy on twitter  @WellsTracy .  Photography by Kivault. The bowler hat, also known as a bob hat, derby (US), billycock or bombín is a hard felt hat with a rounded crown originally created in 1849 for the British soldier and politician Edward Coke, the younger brother of the 2nd Earl of Leicester. The bowler hat was popular with the working class during the Victorian era, and later on with the middle and upper classes in the United Kingdom. Later in the United Kingdom, it would come to be worn as work dress by the officers of the Queen’s Guards. In Ecuador especially the women of Quechua people have used bowler hat since the 1920s when British railway workers made it famous. The bowler once defined British civil servants and bankers, and later American workingmen It was devised in 1849 by the London hat-makers Thomas and William Bowler to fulfill an order placed by the firm of hatters Lock & Co. of St James’s. Lock & Co. had been commissioned by a customer to design a close-fitting, low-crowned hat to protect Coke’s gamekeepers’ heads from low-hanging branches while on horseback. The keepers had previously worn top hats, which were easily knocked off and damaged. Lock & Co. then commissioned the Bowler brothers to solve the problem.Lock & Co. had been commissioned by a customer to design a close-fitting, low-crowned hat to protect Coke’s gamekeepers’ heads from low-hanging branches while on horseback. When Coke arrived in London on 17 December 1849 to collect his hat he reportedly placed it on the floor and stamped hard on it twice to test its strength; the hat withstood this test and Coke paid 12 shillings for it. Especially in Great Britain, most accounts agreed that the customer (and designer of the hat) was William Coke. However, later, a nephew of the 1st Earl of Leicester, provided research that has cast some doubt on this origin story. It is now believed that it was Edward Coke, the younger brother of the 2nd Earl of Leicester, who invented the hat design.

Bowler hat by Tracy Wells,photogrpahy by PMKells

Devised in 1849 by the London hat-makers Thomas and William Bowler

The bowler, not the cowboy hat or sombrero, was the most popular hat in the American West, prompting Lucius Beebe to call it “the hat that won the West”. Both cowboys and railroad workers preferred the hat because it would not blow off easily in strong wind, or when sticking one’s head out the window of a speeding train. It was worn by both lawmen and outlaws, including Bat Masterson, Butch Cassidy, Black Bart, and Billy the Kid. It is in America the hat came to be commonly known as the “derby”,and Wild West outlaw Marion Hedgepeth was commonly referred to as “the Derby Kid”.

Hatshoot 2013 No7, Steam Punk Boaters! Pt3

The boater is a fairly formal hat, equivalent in formality to the Homburg, and so is correctly worn either in its original setting with a blazer, or in the same situations as a Homburg, such as a smart lounge suit, or with black tie,

Oh no it isn’t! When millinery designer Tracy Wells is involved and combines the boater with Steam Punk it is going to be  a creative experience and fun. I sure enjoyed this shoot!

Tracy Wells designer Millinery,photography by PM Kell

Tracy Wells designer Millinery,photography by PM Kell

Hatshoot 2013 No7, Steam Punk Boaters! Pt2

The boater is a fairly formal hat, equivalent in formality to the Homburg, and so is correctly worn either in its original setting with a blazer, or in the same situations as a Homburg, such as a smart lounge suit, or with black tie,

Oh no it isn’t! When millinery designer Tracy Wells is involved and combines the boater with Steam Punk it is going to be  a creative experience and fun. I sure enjoyed this shoot!

Tracy Wells designer Millinery,photography by PM Kells

Tracy Wells designer Millinery,photography by PM Kells

Hatshoot 2013 No7, Steam Punk Boaters! Pt1

The boater is a fairly formal hat, equivalent in formality to the Homburg, and so is correctly worn either in its original setting with a blazer, or in the same situations as a Homburg, such as a smart lounge suit, or with black tie,

Oh no it isn’t! When millinery designer Tracy Wells is involved and combines the boater with Steam Punk it is going to be  a creative experience and fun. I sure enjoyed this shoot!

Tracy Wells designer Millinery

Tracy Wells designer Millinery